The Gamer’s Journey

For the second time around, I’ve written something on storytelling in games. To make things a little different, this time I sought the wisdom and experiences of others. This here post is merely to announce it to the world, and link to the relevant bits. The most important thing to get out of the way, is that I’m really honoured to have had such remarkable people offer me their time and input, so that I could write more about it.

I really couldn’t have done this quite as nicely without them, so if you do enjoy this feature, you really ought to investigate those people. There may be an update to the feature in the future, as there were some late additions of input from other people who weren’t quite ready, but my enthusiasm to have this unleashed upon the world was too much to bear.

I’ll avoid my usual level of self-discouragement and say that as far as Fictioner’s Net goes, The Gamer’s Journey is certainly a feature. I’m repeating what’s said in the feature itself, but the name owes Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey for inspiring the name, and it owes a great many to discussions about story that inspired me enough that I wanted to write a little about games with compelling storylines.

Mass Effect 3 lets you explore Mars, which is a little different to how it was in Zak McKracken. No monolith, for starters, though uh... okay, the Prothean ruins satisfy that. Better than that though, it let you explore Shepard, and by extension, yumanity. Humanity.
Mass Effect 3 lets you explore Mars, which is a little different to how it was in Zak McKracken. No monolith, for starters, though uh… okay, the Prothean ruins satisfy that. Better than that though, it let you explore Shepard, and by extension, yumanity. Humanity.

There are spoilers here in the series, but the games that are spoiled by a particular post are mentioned at the beginning of each section. There are obviously so many games that could have been used as examples in place of those that are, and I encourage anyone that cares to comment about them. I will have missed a great many favourites, and perhaps held up games that wouldn’t be a blip on your radar. I doubt I’d agree with each of those that offered their input in all game-related circumstances, and my opinion and that of whoever’s reading it, will be different.

Most of my other writing here is related more to the act of writing itself, but I love games and have done so for many years. They’re always sat side by side, and occasionally they’ve crossed over, whether it be a Kings Quest fan-fic I started years ago, or a novel I started adapting into a blocky adventure game. They capture the imagination with rich, detailed worlds, and emotional, vibrant characters. Being able to explore other worlds is a great part of that, but being able to explore other lives, and on my own schedule? That’s an experience I wish everyone had. Talking about it is the first step to getting them to experience it, or to know enough that they would want to.

If you’d like to read the actual page(s), click here:

Feature: The Gamer’s Journey

3 thoughts on “The Gamer’s Journey

  1. Have you played The Last of Us? I know there was a lot of hype for it, but I think it was genuinely well-deserved. The characters were fully fleshed out and realistic. There was no real “hero” or “villain” in the stories. The complication of humans and human interaction was beautiful. I loved everything about it. I think it’s one of the best stories I’ve seen, and the attention to detail in the main story and side stories was spectacular.

    1. I thought there was a bit of hype, but then I followed Naughty Dog. I’m guessing from your comment that you haven’t read through the feature? It’s definitely one of the games mentioned.

      1. Admittedly, I was in a bit of a rush; I only read the introduction. Still, I’m glad to see you mentioning a lot of my favorite games – Bioshock, Fallout, The Last of Us, The Walking Dead… Good articles.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s